The Real Estate of LA’s Broadcast and Recording Studios

December 16, 2016 / Connect Media Q&A / Michael McCormick, President & CEO, McCormick Construction

corporate portraiture of McCormick Construction employee

Los Angeles is a cultural and entertainment hub. Various broadcast, motion pictures and recording studios claim the city as their home base, so Connect Media caught up with McCormick Construction’s President and CEO Michael McCormick to discuss how the real estate for the music and TV industry differs from the usual office and retail spaces around town.

Q. What are the most sought-after building types and locations for broadcast and recording studio projects?

A. Studios target many different building types; however, the most sought-after types are industrial buildings because of the open interior space within, which gives the studios flexibility to design and construct the space to fit their needs. Additionally, “clear span” – high ceilings and free of columns – makes these building types very attractive. Because of this, many broadcast and recording studios are also adaptive reuse projects.

When it comes to location, Burbank, Culver City and Hollywood are hotspots for studios; therefore, demand for space in these areas is high. But it is not just about finding available space in those areas. It’s also extremely important to think about the surrounding area and external noise, such as nearby train tracks, busy streets and airports.

Q. Why is it so crucial for the project team to meet early on in the development process?

A. These projects require team members with a high-level of expertise and understanding of the industry. Having all of the primary project team members meet early on is very important to make sure that all aspects of the project, and the delivery process, are being appropriately addressed.

Prior to starting work on behalf of Westwood One/Cumulus Media for completion of a three-building recording and broadcast studio campus in Culver City, we met with the architect, subcontractorsand the client at the site to walk through the facility, so the client could show the entire team specifically what they were looking to achieve with the renovations. Throughout the process, McCormick Construction worked closely with the structural engineer and the architect to overcome any project challenges, including how to attach the individual studio ceilings to the existing brick wall to make sure it was aesthetically pleasing and structurally sound, in addition to providing proper sound isolation between the rooms to separate noise.

Q. How do requirements for broadcast and recording studios differ from other commercial spaces?

A. Whether it is a broadcast, recording or motion picture studio, each studio type has a different set of acoustic requirements depending on what is being produced and the equipment that is used. Sound transmission class (STC) requirements are key to ensuring…

 

Click here to read the full article on Connect Media.