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A Renovated Urgent Care

Malibu Urgent Care Magazine | January 2018 | By Caroline Laganas

After 60 years, Malibu Urgent Care is undergoing its own treatment and care in the form of renovations. Among other improvements the renovated Urgent Care will provide handicap access and new exam tables.

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The Malibu Urgent Care Center recently announced its plans to renovate the 60-year-old building located on the corner of Webb Way and PCH. The renovations will begin in the later part of February and last for approximately three months, said Helene Eisenberg, the president of the non-profit Friends of Malibu Urgent Care Center. Barring unexpected projects during construction, the project is anticipated to cost $624,000, said Eisenberg. “With the hope that there will be no unexpected problems, we anticipate the cost to be approximately $624,000,” said Eisenberg. Friends of Malibu Care Center oversees funding for after-hours operations and all fundraising activities for Malibu Urgent Care Center, according to their website. “Our board’s responsibility is to ensure that the Malibu Urgent Care Center never closes,” said Marlene Matlow, the secretary of Friends of Malibu Urgent Care Center. “Thus far, donations have provided that commitment to be secure. However, we must continue to raise funds to cover the renovation as well as our dedication for the permanence of the Urgent Care Center.”

 

During renovations, the contractor, McCormick Construction, will place a trailer on the property to serve as the temporary housing for the staff and patient waiting room, said Eisenberg. “Most of the work will be done during the night,” said Matlow. “however, we’re hoping the patients will be understanding and tolerant during construction.” The renovation plans include creating an ADA compliant parking lot and building entrance, along with adding a second bathroom and new air conditioning system. “The most challenging aspect is to keep the business operating while the facility is being remodeled,” said Dr. David M Frankle, an ER physician at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in LA and Malibu Urgent Care doctor since 1994. “We’re going to have to adjust things on a phase by phase basis.”

 

Part of the improvement will include new flooring, cabinetry, ceilings, and walls. There will also be new furniture such as waiting room furniture, beds and exam tables. “It’s not just cosmetics,” said Dr. Jill Furguson, an ER physician at Community Memorial Hospital in Ventura and Malibu Urgent Care doctor since 1994. “We’ve tried to identify things to enhance the patient experience.” Patients can expect an indoor and outdoor waiting area, enhanced privacy with a check-in alcove and an improved lab area. The renovations will incorporate a state-of-the-art x-ray machine, updated equipment and the use of electronic medical records. “This is a community I’m gald to serve and help,” said Frankly. I get a lot of satisfaction out of taking acre of my friends, neighbors and even people from out of town. It’s a privilege to practice here. For us, it’s a matter of providing good and quality service.” malibu-urgent-care-2

 

Despite the renovation costs, a patient’s amount per visit will hardly fluctuate, said Furguson. “Insurance companies work with us to decide costs and they don’t care what we look like inside,” she said. For Pepperdine University senior Emily Sparks, Malibu Urgent Care is an affordable option. “I think if the Urgent Care takes your insurance plan, then I’d recommend anyone in Malibu use it,” said Sparks.

 

Malibu Urgent Care is open 365 days a year from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. with extended hours from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. in July, August and September. “We depend on the Malibu community to show their agreement that the Malibu Urgent Care Center is a vital asset to Malibu,” said Matlow. “The best way is by donating money.”

Cumulus

Tackling Acoustical Issues in Broadcast and Recording Facilities

September 5, 2017 | Facilities Net | Michael McCormick

Of all the things Los Angeles is known for, it is most well-known as an entertainment hub. Various broadcast, motion picture, and recording studios claim the city as their home, and are continually constructing new facilities and renovating existing spaces to accommodate them.

When constructing a new studio, challenges arise right from the start. Demand for space is high, particularly in Hollywood, Burbank, Culver City, and other media-centric areas. The most sought-after building type for a studio is industrial, such as a warehouse, because they typically offer a “clear span,” providing substantial unobstructed inside heights.

However, the challenge doesn’t end with finding available space in the ideal geographical location. The surrounding tenants and businesses are also crucial to the success of the project. For example, entertainment studios must avoid areas directly adjacent to railroad tracks, busy street traffic, and airports due to the external noise and vibrations. Even “noisy” neighbors should be considered when choosing a space. If sharing a building, any and all adjacent tenants must be mindful of their sound output.

Larger studios often also require specialty lighting systems, so the roof structure of the facility must be designed to support the heavy loads of a grid system. This may include catwalks, lighting fixtures, speakers, electrical equipment, and more. Additionally, in order to accommodate large pieces of equipment, “elephant doors” — tall sound stage doors that often slide or pivot open — are another very important piece of the puzzle for studios. Often, these doors must also be designed to meet certain soundproofing requirements.

Acoustical requirements and accommodations are a primary concern for both new construction and renovations. Whether it is a broadcast, recording, or motion picture studio, each type has a different set of audio requirements depending on what is being produced and the equipment that is used. Sound transmission class (STC) requirements are key to ensuring the studios have the sound separation they need to effectively develop and produce their content.

Walls, windows, flooring, and other items must be designed and selected specifically to meet these STC requirements and minimize sound interference. One of the most common ways to meet these requirements is to create a “room within a room,” or a “box within a box,” where the floor, walls and ceiling are isolated from the main structure, so there is no outside sound transmission or vibration feedback. This method was used during construction of Nickelodeon’s Studio B — a voiceover recording studio — to meet the sound requirements for the voiceover recording studio.

When turning an existing building into a broadcasting space, the walls are often too thin for the necessary sound integrity. The solution may require tearing out walls entirely, but sometimes the problem can be fixed by adding a second wall in front of it or sealing the walls at the ceiling, floor, and around window and door frames. Sealing walls is often overlooked during construction of traditional buildings, and can be a quick fix for improving acoustics on a budget.

Machinery can pose another acoustical challenge. For example, one solution for a noisy HVAC system or mechanical room is relocation. However, when this option is not available, HVAC systems can still achieve satisfactory noise levels in studio and stage settings. For this to happen, air must be introduced at a very low velocity compared to more conventional ventilation and air conditioning systems. Ceiling diffusers and grilles quite often have bulkhead light fittings placed underneath them to prevent the “dumping” of cold air, and to optimize the directivity related to sound level at different frequencies. For the renovation of Westwood One/Cumulus Media’s facility in Culver City, Calif., the HVAC system was installed on a special platform isolating system.

Click here to see the full article on FacilitiesNet.com.

Cumulus

Westwood One Converges in Culver City

August 17, 2017 | Radio Magazine | Doug Irwin, CPBE AMD DRB

Eight studios were built-out during the 2016 remodel

You’ve probably heard of Culver City, Calif., but likely couldn’t place it on a map. It’s another media suburb in the greater Los Angeles area.

Origination point for the 400-station NBC sports network. In the back of the room, the producer’s workspace; in front, the board operator position.

The building was built in the 1920s, according to Cumulus Broadcasting Regional Director of Engineering for the Southwest/West Anthony Vitiello, whose office is located there. It originally served as a Ford and Maserati dealership.That it isn’t well known belies its importance in the country’s media and broadcast landscape, since it’s home to some rather large broadcast institutions (old and new), including Westwood One’s West Coast facility, the subject of our Facility Showcase this month.

“In the rafters, there’s still a Maserati logo up there,” said Vitiello. Brick walls and bow truss roofs were a typical construction style in the early part of the 20th century.

Westwood One bought the three buildings (one of which housed sales and admin personnel, including promotions) in 1990, and they became the headquarters for the national network. In 2003, Westwood One used McCormick Construction of Burbank, Calif., to build out the space. Studios for Metro Traffic were constructed — 28 independent studios for traffic reporters, along with three offices. The master control room was expanded to its current size, as well.

Lobby waiting areas for guests. The NBC Sports network producer work space can also be seen through the window.

As part of the process, the interior of the building was remodeled, and during construction, the staff of Westwood One squeezed into the building across the street, while McCormick Construction had unobstructed reign to build the studios.Metro Traffic was sold and moved out in 2012, and afterward Westwood One ran a split operation between two buildings: One is the current building, and the other is across the street where KABC and KLOS now reside. Once the sale of the land on La Cienega occurred (the former home of the KABC(AM) transmitter, as well as both the KABC and KLOS studios and office) arrangements were made to relocate KABC and KLOS into the Westwood One buildings in Culver City. This is what prompted the latest studio buildout.

Eight studios were built-out during the 2016 remodel: Studio A, for Zach Sang; Studios B&C, which are multipurpose; Studios D&E for the NBC Sports network; studio K, for the “The Big Time with Whitney Allen;” and Studio L, for production. Other studios in the facility were pre-existing from the split building operation.

Staff moved into the newly renovated facility in August of 2016.

STUDIO LINEUPS

The Zach Sang studio in Culver City. Custom furniture designed by Omnirax.

Sierra Automated Systems consoles and a three-frame 32KD router (supporting 1,536 inputs and outputs) make up the heart of the Westwood One west coast facility. On-air playback and automation is based on the ENCO system. All studio PCs, whether for general purposes or ENCO, are connected to the rack rooms via KVM extenders.

Furniture, next to consoles and routers, represents the greatest capital expense in a project like this, and so I asked David Holland of furniture maker Omnirax about their role in the project. He said collaboration with Vitiello was key to the success of the furniture designs.

 

 

Click here to see the full article on RadioMagOnline.com.

Cumulus

McCormick Construction completes Westwood One renovation

April 13, 2017 / Property Funds World

Cumulus

McCormick Construction has completed renovations of the Westwood One campus in Culver City, California, a 45,000-square-foot radio broadcast facility.

The campus, which is owned by CIM Group, consists of three buildings – two adjacent and one across the street – located at 8935, 8965 and 8944 Lindblade Ave.

Cumulus Media recently acquired Westwood One, which added sports, news, talk, music and programming services enabling Cumulus to provide a wider variety of options to approximately 10,000 US radio stations, in addition to other media and international platforms.

McCormick, who was the general contractor and led the design-build engineering, was charged with renovating and re-configuring the existing radio broadcast facilities to accommodate the additional radio stations and programs Cumulus Media owns, including KLOS, KABC, The Big Time, NBC Sports Radio and Zach Sang and the Gang. This comprised constructing 21 radio broadcast studios with a sound transmission class (STC) rating of 55, with nine of the studios built to include video/television broadcast standards; the installation of 37 private offices, 75 cubicles, conference rooms and new kitchens; upgrading two existing server rooms and adding a new server room; and exterior building modifications.

“It’s been an honour working on this renovation as we have completed a number of projects for Westwood One in the past,” says Michael McCormick, CEO of McCormick. “We were pleased to be able to assist the client in creating state-of-the-art studios for their employees while creating an optimal listening experience for their consumers.”

McCormick oversaw and facilitated structural and MEP engineering plans, fire-life-safety plans and provided coordinated oversight between Westwood One’s electrical engineering team and Southern California Edison’s engineers to install additional electrical power services.

“The team at McCormick has a sophisticated understanding of the specific requirements for broadcast and recording studios and has worked with some of the most well-known studios in Los Angeles,” says Eric Wiler, senior vice president, Westwood One. “Through careful planning and phased construction, McCormick ensured we remained fully operational and mitigated disruptions throughout the construction process.”

The facility, which was originally built with brick walls and bow truss roofs for manufacturing users in the 1930s, was first converted into a state-of-the art radio broadcast facility for Westwood One by McCormick in 1984.

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For more coverage of the completion of this project, visit:

 

Where Do Broadcast Studios Find Space?

August 29, 2016 / GlobeSt / Kelsi Marie Borland

Entertainment has long been a jobs driver in Los Angeles, but broadcast and recording studios are seeing construction challenges in this ever-changing industry, Michael McCormick of McCormick Construction says in this EXCLUSIVE interview.

Michael McCormick is the president and CEO of McCormick Construction.

The entertainment industry has long been a driver of jobs in Los Angeles, but changes in technology and the dearth of infill industrial supply is creating new challenges for the development of broadcast and recording studios. Michael McCormick, president and CEO of McCormick Construction, says that location and specific industrial product are the most important characteristics of a redevelopment site, but technology now also plays an integral role. The firm has worked on several broadcast and recording studio projects, including Westwood One/Cumulus Media, broadcast and recording studios for Nickelodeon’s Studio B in Burbank and CBS Radio in Los Angeles. To find out more about this niche of the entertainment industry, how developers today are finding projects in this competitive market and the challenges of building these spaces, we sat down with McCormick for an EXCLUSIVE interview.

GlobeSt.com: With Los Angeles’ high-density market, how are developers finding space for their broadcast and recording studio projects?

Michael McCormick: Demand for space is high, particularly in Hollywood, Burbank, Culver City and other media-centric areas in Los Angeles. Burbank, specifically, has become a hot spot for animation and digital content providers. The most sought-after building type for a studio is industrial, such as a warehouse, because they typically need to provide a “clear span,” be free of columns and have generous inside clear heights. As a result, many studio construction projects are also adaptive reuse projects. Larger studios, especially motion picture studios,

require extensive lighting grids, large, sliding “elephant doors,” and the ability to move bulk materials and large equipment using trucks and lifts.

Location is key. Studios should avoid locations directly adjacent to railroad tracks, busy street traffic or airports due to the external noise and vibrations. However; being in close proximity to transportation hubs can be beneficial.

GlobeSt.com: What are the unique requirements for constructing broadcast and recording studios?

McCormick: Having the proper acoustics is crucial for a studio. McCormick has performed work on various types of studios, but one of our technical specialties is sound transmission class (STC) requirements. Whether it is a recording or broadcast studio or a motion picture studio, each has a different set of requirements due to the sensitivity of the equipment and the content being produced…

Click here to read the full article at GlobeSt.com.

McCormick Construction Completes Interior Renovation of Neurobrands’ Corporate Office in Burbank

Project provides greater efficiency and a more collaborative work space for the growing brand

 

BURBANK, Calif. – McCormick Construction, a premier builder shaping the culture of buildings and businesses throughout the Western United States since 1914, has completed construction on a 14,000-square-foot interior renovation project for beverage manufacturer, Neurobrands llc’s, corporate office located at 2550 N. Hollywood Way in Burbank, California. Neurobrands originally occupied two disconnected office suites in the North Hollywood Way office building, which is in close proximity to the Hollywood Burbank Airport.

Due to Neurobrands’ recent success, the company needed a larger space where employees could advance and develop current and new products, including the company’s popular Neuro line of drinks. In an effort to create a more dynamic and collaborative work environment, McCormick worked with designer, DSR Design Inc., to incorporate more company branding and desirable office features like natural lighting, more efficient work spaces, collaborative areas and additional amenities.

 

In order to accelerate the construction schedule and deliver the office space within 12 weeks McCormick completed the project in two phases, while only occupying up to 35 percent of the space at one time.

“Corporate interior improvement projects present a variety of challenges; however, ensuring businesses maintain normal operations is our primary consideration,” said Michael McCormick, president and CEO of McCormick Construction. “As a result, early collaboration, strategic planning and up-to-date knowledge of the permitting process are key factors in delivering a successful tenant improvement project.”

During phase one, employees were all moved from the approximately 12,000-square-foot main office suite to the second office suite, known as “the executive wing.”  The work completed in phase one comprised the addition of two conference rooms, featuring glass walls and large glass sliding doors, 15 new executive offices, 50 open workspaces and a new kitchen/breakroom. McCormick also constructed a new product development laboratory with a 3Form glass table where Neurobrands’ “drink scientists” will work to create new products.

Phase two included moving employees from the executive wing into the newly renovated space while the executive wing underwent renovations. After four weeks of renovations in the executive wing, both spaces had been completely renovated and employees were allowed to return to their respective locations. To ensure Neurobrands remained fully operational throughout the entirety of the construction process, McCormick worked nights and weekends in order to complete the project on-time and on-budget.

A major focus of the project was to create a more collaborative environment within the office that would foster creativity and product innovations. Larger meeting spaces and open-concept common areas were created to allow employees to meet and discuss new concepts and strategies, helping to facilitate a strong team-focused corporate culture.

“McCormick’s decades of experience in tenant improvement projects made them the easy choice for us to partner with for our corporate office renovation,” said Calvin Larson, corporate communications and technology director of Neurobrands llc.  “We’re thrilled to have this new space for our employees, so that they can continue to develop groundbreaking products that promote health and well-being.”

In order to provide a more sustainable and healthy work environment, McCormick installed energy efficient lighting systems that comply with Title 24 regulations and incorporated more natural light throughout the office via daylight harvesting – a technique that reduces the amount of overhead lighting needed by more efficiently using (or adding) ambient light sources such as windows and skylights, as well as integrating automatic dimmers when natural lighting is sufficient.

McCormick’s project management team also included Alan Hartley, director of interiors; and David Valenti, superintendent.

McCormick’s recent tenant improvement project experience also includes Los Angeles Kings Training Facility, Contract Services Administrative Trust Fund, CBS Radio, and Citrus Tower Office Building, all of which are located in Los Angeles.

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About Neurobrands llc:

Neuro is a groundbreaking line of functional beverages made with natural ingredients in fully recyclable packaging. Neuro was formulated by nutrition scientists and is backed by scientific research to promote health and well-being. Each low-calorie beverage in the collection contains essential vitamins, minerals, amino acids and proprietary dietary ingredients. For more information, please visit http://www.drinkneuro.com/.

 

MEDIA CONTACTS:

The Hoyt Organization

Claire Marshall, cmarshall@hoytorg.com

Melinda Peffer, mpeffer@hoytorg.com

310-373-0103